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president obama offer not overseeing a more pronounced recovered. on the foreign-policy front, he is hitting him on a lack of resolve. i go to the second paragraph that i read, making the republican argument that this president lacks a result. when you do that, it invites all kinds of activity around the world ca. mr. romney was in new york, speaking at the clinton global initial gen. he argued that foreign aid it needs to have more strings attached to. what is your sense of what he might do these of the foreign policy. the last of these presidential debates will b specifice wii about foreign policy. this notion that is president lacks resolve and our foreign policy is lacking under his leadership. >> i don't know. to think that our problem is too little military seems to me again to get it completely wrong. we wasted a great deal of the past 11 years in two wars we never should of had. the iraq war on phony pretenses. the afghanistan war, another war we should never have had. we spent trillions of dollars, a waste of money and a waste of blood. it seems what romney is saying we do not have
and advance our values in the modern world. >> let me turn to foreign policy. what should be done about syria, in your judgment? >> >> i mean, there is unspeakable slaughter going on there. >> unspeakable but nothing is being done, except supply arms to -- >> you have got three things going on, haven't you? you have got a challenge from the people to the government, that is how this all started. you have got sectarian conflicts between the different communities of syria with support from the different regional powers, iran, saudi, et cetera, and you have then got the geo politics, u.s. and uk on one side and russia on the other. i think the hole in the middle of this is what is a post as sad, assad syria going to look at, what is the political and security order of a post assad era on? >> you has mosni on the panel you need to get egypt, iran and others around the table. >> it seems me he is right, basically, because all of those four countries have got a buying interest and we have interests as well, so i think we -- >> you don't mind the idea of iran being part of that and saudi arabia? >>
, on october 16. that's to be followed by a foreign policy debate at lynn university in boca raton, florida, on october 22. the vice president shall debate will be held october 11 at center college in danville, kentucky. heading into the series, the latest polls show that nationally the obama-romney race is still close. but the president is moving ahead in most of the battle ground states. to get a sense of where the race stands, and what each campaign believes the candidates must do in those debates, we're joined by our regular duo, stuart rothenberg of the "rothenberg political report" and "roll call," and susan page, washington bureau chief of "u.s.a. today." welcome back to both of you. >> good to be here. woodruff: we just reported again, stu, nationally the race looks pretty close but in the battle ground states the president seems to have lead. what do you make of all that? >> that's exactly the case. national numbers show obama leading by two to four points. some polls have it it a little bit more. it's in the swing states particularly critical ohio where the obama lead appears to b
at the presidential candidates on foreign policy. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: intel bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
at that and i think that kind of sophistication about foreign policy, that sort of experience in the world and also a sensibility that the other parts of the world different than ours are not bad. romney takes this american exceptionism too far in saying we are the good guys, our country right or wrong, these foreigners, europe is sort of bad, it is sort of, you know, it is sort of rotten, at least. and the rest of the world is dangerous and the arabs and all, there is a sense of the other is evil, it is not evil dangerous and i think the president is a much more positive view about the world, and perhaps less truculent and less mill tar risk so i think that is a big decision .. do we want to continue to join the world or do we want to stand-alone and use american exceptionism as our sort of justification for more military action? i think it is a real difference. it is within the 40-yard line on both sides but there is a difference, center right, center left and i think it is a good judgment for the american people to think which direction should we be heading. >> #02: thank you, chris, g
of consequence. >> absolutely. >> one of romney's top foreign policy advisors said the other day that obama has made the united states look impo nent the world. dot facts bear that out. >> i disagree with that. i disagree with that. the suggestion that somehow america could or even should be in the drivers seat in the arab spring is inherently ridiculous. i mean what happened in egypt was done by the people, the young people, primarily, in tahrir square. then the egypt that was left having lost its autocratic superstructure was still an egypt, just look at the distribution of the population, most likely to produce an islamist government, with which it did. all along the way we should try to maximize our values and our interests, including freedom and human rights, and not just majority rule but minority rights, and individual rights. but we couldn't control it, and we shouldn't. and i expect that's what president morsi will say here tomorrow. but if you look at libya, we had more opportunities to influence it, and we did. and we influenced it in a very positive way. and they like us more than a
were economy-- >> i know, but the forum was so easy you could bring it up. they brought up foreign policy and osama bin laden and he brought up the middle east. there was no mention of same-sex marriage. no mention of the environment. >> no mention of mitt romney's tax returns, which has been-- >> he gave obama an opening. he said maybe i have the wrong accountant. >> that was a great opening. >> that was a wide open. >> that's what i meant about the rest. >> woodruff: you think the fact the president hasn't debated since 2008. >> perhaps, john kerry is a skilled debater, but john kerry also wants to be secretary of state. i wonder how tough he went in those sections because that was the charge against david stockman after ronald reagan in '84. that's why reagan, he was too tough on him. >> ifill: can we talk about body language? one of the thinks we remember is the way al exwoar crowded george w. bush and gave him the look or the way someone sighed, the way the two relate standing next to each other. did you get anything watching that? >> i'm not sure there will be a moment easy t
. our questions will be equally divided between foreign and domestic policy matters. >> brown: jim lehrer moderated his first presidential debate in 1988 and nine more since, as well as a vice presidential debate. inñr 1996 and 2000, he moderated all the presidential debates, the first person to do that. in his book "tension city" he writes an insider's account of debates own the last several decades. we talked about it at his washington, d.c. home. >> lehrer: the bottom line, jeff, when a debate is over that i moderate, i want everybody to say, "okay, here you have seen and heard the candidates fo$Ñ president of the united states on the same stage at the same time talking aboutÑi the same things, and you can judge them, not just on content-- because by then people know about lock boxes and social security and all those issues. they want to take a measure of the person. i mean, do you like this guy? is he tell the truth? all that kind of stuff. and you see them right there together, it's a huge test. >> brown: you write about the preparation, the period, the tension for you lead
for foreign investment to be blocked in the u.s. this is the first time in 22 years. is this more about american politics than in national security policy? >> of the white house said that it took this decision because the company at the heart of the dispute could have taken actions which would have impaired u.s. national security. these when farms lie close to a military base in oregon. that is used as a training site for unmanned drones, which of course is highly secretive and sensitive equipment. the chinese company says that it will fight the decision by mr. obama to block the sale. they said that he acted unlawfully. here in china, the decision is being seen as a political one and not based on national security. the state-run news agency put out an editorial saying that this was an example of china- bashing. you might remember that mitt romney has criticized barack obama for not taking a tough enough line on china. the contention of the chinese media is that mr. obama has made this decision in order to win voters. >> you are watching "bbc world news america," still to come -- the do
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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